Monthly Archives: April 2013

Inspired in April

Every week I introduce several artists that inspire me on my visual diary on tumblr, inspired by 7188.
More and more, I discover the pleasure of looking at other people’s work, and the importance of “knowing your peers.”
I think it is true that photographers in general do not know much or care much about what their follow photographers really do. If that’s a good thing or a bad one is a completely different discussion (likely an interesting one!).

Here, I am presenting some of the artists of last month with only one image per artist, which often only represents the scope of their work meagerly. To see more of each artist, check inspired by 7188 to see my personal preference (art critics would probably hate me for picking what I picked haha), or check the artist’s pages directly (by clicking on their names). Enjoy!

Li Hui

Li Hui
© Li Hui

Her photos made my brain fuse pop right away, and then I felt some melty goodness in there. Silent and intimate, hidden and mysterious, very calm, sometimes lost. (link to blog)

 

azu sur

Spatiotemporal © azu sur
Spatiotemporal © azu sur

This is his photo “Spatiotemporal.” Very intriguing, like a portal to another world. I have no idea what kind of place this was taken at, but you can’t deny the magnetic attraction it has, can you. (link on blog)

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Do your photos really matter?

  •    How can you distinguish good from bad photos?
  •    Everyone’s opinion is not of equal value.
  •    The art skill of observation

Do your photos matter? To you? To anyone?

That is the question I have been focusing on these days, but you tell me!

In an article titled “On the Strange Business of Mattering” Francis Hodgson put down his thoughts on the topic of “mattering,” how he calls it. Here’s a short video clip of him elaborating on his thoughts.

What distinguishes good photos from bad ones? And how do you find them in an ever increasing pile of crappy photos that accumulate in the millions each and every day?
Well, the answer lies in the question “Do they matter?” – to you, to the distributor, to the viewer. But, how do you know if they do?

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Tokyo, JAPAN - SHOHEI live body painting performance

Japanese Body Painting

In March I shot some photos for an event organized by ERECT Magazine, a Japanese arts magazine and book publisher.

The event was an exhibition (“SUPER ERECT EXHIBITION”) with and by artists published by ERECT, and was one of many events happening at the annual Roppongi Art Night in Tokyo. One of the show’s highlights was the live body painting session by Shohei Otomo.

Tokyo, JAPAN - SHOHEI live body painting performance

Tokyo, JAPAN. 2013. – Japanese artist SHOHEI doing a live body painting performance at Super ERECT Exhibition at the Roppongi Art Night 2013.

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©Harry Callahan

One for all, all for Harry Callahan

Harry Callahan woke up with the first sunlight, washed himself and had a light breakfast. Then he took his camera, loaded a fresh roll of film and took a photo of his wife Eleanor, still sleeping, before going outside. Chicago was cold in March. He wandered about the streets he knew so well, nothing particular on his mind, no particular goal. Every now and then a scene would catch his eye, catch his mood, and he would take a couple of shots and walk on.

This, at least, is what a typical morning in the life of Harry Callahan, one of the few innovators of modern American photography, could have been like, the way I imagine it. Of course there is no way of knowing what really went on in the head of this man whose photographs were displayed no less than 38 times in the famous Museum of Modern Art in New York. But the following words by John Szarkowski let me believe I am not that far off:

The point is that for Harry Callahan photography has been a way of living – his way of meeting and making peace with the day.

 

©Harry Callahan

©Harry Callahan

Fast forward to Tokyo, Japan in the year 2013.

Here I am, on my creative journey, being told from all sides to focus more on one thing, that I have to get one style and keep pushing it consistently.

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